Tribulus bullshit.

A Systematic Review on the Herbal Extract Tribulus terrestris and the Roots of its Putative Aphrodisiac and Performance Enhancing Effect, Journal of Dietary Supplements, Informa Healthcare

 

The results showed that trials varied in duration, dosage and supplementation with TT as sole or combined treatment, rendering meta-analysis impossible. A limited number of animal studies displayed a significant increase in serum testosterone levels after TT administration, but this effect was only noted in humans when TT was part of a combined supplement administration. Literature available for the effectiveness of TT on enhancing testosterone concentrations is limited. Evidence to date suggests that TT is ineffective for increasing testosterone levels in humans, thus marketing claims are unsubstantiated. The nitric oxide release effect of TT may offer a plausible explanation for the observed physiological responses to TT supplementation, independent of the testosterone level.

Boris Sheiko – Original CMS Bench-Only Cycle

http://worldpowerliftingcom.blogspot.com.au/2011/09/previously-published-bench-press.html

Here’s a link to a detailed outline and translated description of the original bench program published in Sheiko’s original book. . An outline of the program with full assistance is in the following links (extended to a 14 week cycle):

http://unitedstrength.boards.net/thread/83/gimme-1

http://unitedstrength.boards.net/thread/84/gimme-2

http://unitedstrength.boards.net/thread/85/gimme-3

Effects of long-term creatine supplementation on liver and kidney functions in American college football players.

Effects of long-term creatine s… [Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2002] – PubMed – NCBI

Therefore, it appears that oral supplementation with CrM has no long-term detrimental effects on kidney or liver functions in highly trained college athletes in the absence of other nutritional supplements.